1970 GT

This is an area for discussion about Restoration issues.

Re: 1970 GT

Postby lord13 » Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:57 am

yeah that's a 'seam sealed' join, its spotted underneath obviously but that top bit is just sealant :)
Image
lord13
Brabham Viva
Brabham Viva
 
Posts: 745
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 8:46 pm
Location: ***CLASSIFIED***

Re: 1970 GT

Postby StefanM » Fri Apr 13, 2018 11:17 am

Open up the seam and clean up as much as possible and then fill with lead completely . Then just adjust with something to look like a joint. Perhaps you might need to make a "tray" (u formed pice of metal) in the bottom and clamp from underneath so the lead wont melt away and drip in the trunk........
Plastic in that area will obviously crack later.
StefanM
GT Viva
GT Viva
 
Posts: 466
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 9:10 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: 1970 GT

Postby jamezz666 » Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:10 am

I genuinely didn't have a clue that they would've be sealed.. i always thought that seam would've been atleast spot welded, as from the inside of the boot area, there is some spot welds along the remains of the lip . I'll use something like tiger seal then, as that's fairly good with sealing and sticking parts.

I Know most people would disagree on doing this, but i brush painted the underside of the bonnet and i need to do another coat to the underside of the boot lid. The paint isn't too bad looking but it's nothing spectactular..

I had the car running for the first time in a while the other day and for some reason, the clutch peddle is sitting lower than the level of the brake pedal :? plus the bugger feels really heavy.. but that may be down to me not driven anything old for over a year :lol:

Image
Image
Image
how do you delete
User avatar
jamezz666
GT Viva
GT Viva
 
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 3:24 am
Location: worcestershire

Re: 1970 GT

Postby hbpeter » Sun Apr 15, 2018 1:54 pm

Nothing wrong with the brush painting the mostly hidden bits. Mine did the same with the pedals. Think thats just how they are, its probably heavy due to being a cable and as you say not used in a long time. Try lubricating the cable with some light oil.

Peter
Reading between the lines, dangerous if your waiting for a train.
User avatar
hbpeter
Register Rep
 
Posts: 14197
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 12:11 pm
Location: Thornaby, Cleveland

Re: 1970 GT

Postby jamezz666 » Sat May 12, 2018 5:04 pm

Got some more done to the front. I've nearly finished the shape on the ends of the wings, just trying to sort the fiddly dip line that sits in it. The bonnet actually looks really good after a brush paint and the inner boot looks alright as well. I attempted to fibre glass matt the boot seal lip, but i've found it very hard for the resin to hold in place by itself, so i may have a go at using p40 on that!

Been really busy trying to sort some stuff out on the firenza that i just bought, which i'm doing a Thread on as we speek!
Image
Image
Image
Image
User avatar
jamezz666
GT Viva
GT Viva
 
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 3:24 am
Location: worcestershire

Re: 1970 GT

Postby jamezz666 » Tue May 15, 2018 11:30 am

Yesturday, i luckily purchased a bill blydenstein 4-2-1 manifold! i'll attempt fitting it, this sunday coming and once it's done, i'll put a video on youtube with a link :D

Also could anyone advise what differential oil to use and brand please?

Image
User avatar
jamezz666
GT Viva
GT Viva
 
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 3:24 am
Location: worcestershire

Re: 1970 GT

Postby 1972nail » Tue May 15, 2018 11:51 pm

That's the Blydenstien / Janspeed 'race' style manifold which gives a few extra horses at the top end at the expense of torque whereas the Blydenstien 'road' style manifold gives more torque but looses a couple of bhp in comparison to the 'race' manifold. The race manifold is best suited a full race spec engine where it can really perform. Also the race manifold is a pig to fit and will shake loose at every joint until doomsday.... but it is still more efficient than the cast effort.

Janspeed took the race spec design and made them with smaller pipes which helped make them easier to fit and gave better access to the plugs.

You may have to remove the engine mounting and alternator to get it to fit and you may also need to fit the alternator on the high-level Chevette HS alternator bracket which relocates the alternator on the opposite side of the engine beside the fuel pump.

Here's the 'road' style manifold fitted to my car. The design was adopted for the standard manifold for the HPF but the HPF manifold has smaller pipes.



It's hard to beat the sound of a Slant 4 on a 4 branch....... :lol:
Editor of the VVOC Magazine ReVival

"When you have a Firenza like mine, who needs any Minis?" copyright David Maxwell 1979.
User avatar
1972nail
Old Nail
Old Nail
 
Posts: 3438
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 4:16 pm
Location: Ballymoney Co Antrim - some say....the World's best place to live!

Re: 1970 GT

Postby jamezz666 » Wed May 16, 2018 12:23 pm

Honestly.. you sirare a legend.. you must have all this knowledge written down somewhere :lol:
There was me, thinking i could easily pop it on there, so i could hear the 4 horsemen of the apocalypse rumbling away and then bam! it's just not that easy :lol:
The pipes on this manifold, definitely are small in comparison, to four branchers for the pinto's i've had in the past..
It's a shame that no company already makes the manifolds.. if they did.. i think anyone with a slant 4 would have one 8)
i know i haven't got a race spec engine, but would it make much difference to the 2.3? i'm really wanting to hear the sound of a four branch now! have you got a video of yours?


1972nail wrote:That's the Blydenstien / Janspeed 'race' style manifold which gives a few extra horses at the top end at the expense of torque whereas the Blydenstien 'road' style manifold gives more torque but looses a couple of bhp in comparison to the 'race' manifold. The race manifold is best suited a full race spec engine where it can really perform. Also the race manifold is a pig to fit and will shake loose at every joint until doomsday.... but it is still more efficient than the cast effort.

Janspeed took the race spec design and made them with smaller pipes which helped make them easier to fit and gave better access to the plugs.

You may have to remove the engine mounting and alternator to get it to fit and you may also need to fit the alternator on the high-level Chevette HS alternator bracket which relocates the alternator on the opposite side of the engine beside the fuel pump.

Here's the 'road' style manifold fitted to my car. The design was adopted for the standard manifold for the HPF but the HPF manifold has smaller pipes.

manifold.jpg


It's hard to beat the sound of a Slant 4 on a 4 branch....... :lol:
User avatar
jamezz666
GT Viva
GT Viva
 
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 3:24 am
Location: worcestershire

Re: 1970 GT

Postby 1972nail » Wed May 16, 2018 3:18 pm

You've got to remember that any good tubular exhaust manifold design will be a great improvement over a bad cast design, but there's not a lot of difference between the race and road manifolds when fitted to a road or fast road spec car, you probably wouldn't notice it. It's only when you start going into very high compression ratios, and high lift / overlap cams that the road manifold can't produce the top end goods. That's probably why Janspeed only produced one style of manifold rather than the two different ones that you could buy from DTV.

PD Gough can make you a new Janspeed / DTV race style manifold to order, if the bank will give you another mortgage......

You may find that the race manifold will be so close to the bulkhead that when you blip the throttle it will bump and knock, it may also knock on the engine mount too. DTV recommended that you fit harder engine mounts and an engine stabiliser kit with this manifold. However, due to large production tolerances, not all manifolds cause these problems on all cars.

My brother's Sports Hatch showed evidence of having been fitted with one of these manifolds in the past, the bulkhead had been bashed back with a sledge hammer so far that the spot welds on the chassis leg had popped and the engine mount bracket had been relieved a bit with and angle grinder. It also has the high level alternator bracket fitted.
Editor of the VVOC Magazine ReVival

"When you have a Firenza like mine, who needs any Minis?" copyright David Maxwell 1979.
User avatar
1972nail
Old Nail
Old Nail
 
Posts: 3438
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 4:16 pm
Location: Ballymoney Co Antrim - some say....the World's best place to live!

Re: 1970 GT

Postby jamezz666 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 5:21 pm

Just an update everybody :D since going quiet, i have been spending some days on the viva and well... turned out there was more hidden filler than i first thought :shock: so.. turns out the passenger side floor to corner 5" by 12" was mainly filler, as i tapped it through with a hammer and found no metal, besides metal dust! and that wasn't the worst part! turns out.. the lower section of the door post was filler and expanding foam :lol: so.. in the pictures below, you will see i rebuilt the lower post/wing/sill. not a great job as i ran out of big off cuts of sheet steel, but i did clean it up ect and i'll be giving it a lick of paint.
so as of yesturday i realised i am far to busy with work to carry on doing the exterior body work such as filler/paint ect and have passed it onto a mate to do, who says he will hopefully have it done by 2 weeks time and for a cost of £800!!
below is some pictures and also a link to youtube of the car running outside. Me and dad spent half hour trying to get the bleeder out and obviously i had the easy job of pushing it out, while he steered :roll: :lol:
anyway... i'll try keep this upto date and hopefully everyone else is getting on well with their cars!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgTvAN27CHg

Image
Image
Image
Image
User avatar
jamezz666
GT Viva
GT Viva
 
Posts: 312
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 3:24 am
Location: worcestershire

PreviousNext

Return to Restoration

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron